Professor Mark Atkinson
 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine.

Professor of Diabetes Research, Professor Atkinson was part of one of the first group of researchers to identify the value of measuring immune responses against GAD in persons with type 1 diabetes. Professor Atkinson's research extends to understanding the immunological mechanisms underlying the formation of diabetes, with his primary research goal involving the development of an effective method for preventing and reversing type 1 diabetes. Professor Atkinson has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1997.

Professor Bryndis Birnir
 Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Department of Neuroscience.

Professor of Physiology within the Medical Faculty at Uppsala University. Professor Birnir’s research is focused on GABA signalling and the interplay between the extracellular signal molecule GABA and the high-affinity GABA-A receptors that are ion channels. The study of how these molecules affect secretion of metabolic hormones, cellular excitability and immune modulation shows how processes are of vital importance for many metabolic and inflammatory diseases like diabetes. Professor Birnir has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 2013.

Professor Daniel Kaufman
 UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology.

Professor in Molecular and Medical Pharmacology. Professor Kaufman's research is focused on GAD and its relation to diabetes. In a research paper in November 1993, Professor Kaufman demonstrated that the administration of GAD to mice that would otherwise develop type 1 diabetes prevented the outbreak of this disorder. Professor Kaufman was the first to clone a GAD gene and his lab was the first to demonstrate that a GAD treatment could inhibit diabetes in mice with established autoimmune responses. Professor Kaufman was a member of the group associated with Professor Allan J. Tobin, which was the first to submit a patent application for the full cDNA code for GAD, the patent portfolio that Diamyd Medical licenses. Professor Kaufman has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1996.

Professor Lars Klareskog
 Karolinska University Hospital/Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, Center for Molecular Medicine.

Professor of Rheumatology and Head of the Rheumatology Research Laboratory. Professor Klareskog's research is specifically aimed at the origin and treatment of autoimmune disorders. Professor Klareskog has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1996.

Professor Åke Lernmark
 Lund University/CRC, Malmö, Sweden, Department of Clinical Sciences.

Professor in Experimental Diabetes Research, Professor Lernmark has focused his research on diabetes and at an early stage identified the antigen that later proved to be GAD. He and his colleagues were the first to clone GAD65 from human islets using biochemical methods, and was thus the first to define antibodies against GAD65 in patients with type 1 diabetes. Professor Lernmark was first to use molecular methods to identify HLA genes that are necessary, but not sufficient to develop the disorder. Professor Lernmark has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1996.

Professor David Leslie
 Royal London and St. Bartholomew's School of Medicine, University of London, UK.

Professor of Diabetes and Autoimmunity. Professor Leslie has been Director of the British Diabetic Twin Study since 1982, the world's largest twin study of its type and Principal Investigator of the European Action LADA consortium. By studying twins, Professor Leslie has been able to show the possibilities for predicting and preventing autoimmune diabetes. Professor Leslie has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1999.

Dr. Brooke Ligon
 Mitokine Bioscience LLC, Hancock, Maine, USA.

Dr. Ligon received her medical degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in the United States She trained as a Neurologist at Tufts Medical Center in Boston and also completed her Ph.D. in Neuroscience there. Dr. Ligon has dedicated her research career to demonstrating the critical role GABA plays in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Her basic and clinical science has revealed that restoring GABA is crucial, in the setting of diabetes, to regenerate beta cells, eliminate the immune pathology and restore long-term health. Dr. Ligon has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 2013.

Professor Bart O. Roep
 Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Autoimmune Diseases. . Professor Roep has focused on the role of autoreactive T cells in diabetes by assessing human cellular immune responses, autoantigen identification, and islet allograft rejection and the design and immunological monitoring of immunointervention strategies in clinical type 1 diabetes. Professor Roep has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 2006.

Professor Carani B Sanjeevi
 Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Medicine.

Professor at the Karolinska Institute, Professor Sanjeevi heads a research group “Diabetes Immunology” at the Center for Molecular Medicine in Karolinska University Hospital, in Stockholm. Professor Sanjeevi is also Senior Advisor to the Innovation office of Karolinska Institute. Professor Sanjeevi’s research focuses on developing novel biomarkers for early identification of autoimmune diabetes as maternal-fetal interaction in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. Professor Sanjeevi has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 2015.

Professor Allan J. Tobin
 UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology.

Managing Director of MRSSI Inc. MRSSI advises the High Q Foundation and CHDI, organizations dedicated to finding therapeutics for Huntington's disease. Scientific Director Emeritus of the Hereditary Disease Foundation, which organized the identification of the gene that causes Huntington's disease. Professor Tobin has specialized in the use of molecular methods for synthesis, function and breakdown of GABA, which serves as the major inhibitory signal in the brain and the pancreas. Professor Tobin has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1996.

Professor Qinghua Wang
 Toronto University, Toronto, Canada. Department of Physiology and Medicine.

Professor Wang serves as Senior Scientist in the Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, and as Staff Scientist in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital. He is also Lecturing Professor at Fudan University, Shanghai, in China. Professor Wang and colleagues were first to demonstrate that GABA has dual actions: beta cell replication and anti-inflammation, and showed that GABA treatment prevented and partially reversed type 1 diabetes in mice. Efforts are under way to investigate whether GABA is effective in treating type 1 diabetes in humans. Professor Wang has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 2013.

Professor Hans Wigzell
 Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

MD and Ph.D. Senior Professor of Immunology. Senior Scientific Advisor for the Swedish Government during 1999-2007, The Karolinska Institute, Biocon (India) and HB M Partners (Switzerland). Dr. Wigzell is board member of Karolinska Development (Sweden), Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB (Sweden), Raysearch AB (Sweden) and Intercell (Austria). Dean of Karolinska Insitutet 1995-2003. Dr. Wigzell has been a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board since 1996.